Registration Now Open for the May 26 – 28, 2017 Conference

Echoes of the 1917 Russian Revolution: Decades of Radicalism and Red Scares in the Labour Movements of the Pacific Northwest
May 26 – 28

Early Bird Registration Now Open

Presented in collaboration with the BC Labour Heritage Centre

The PNLHA and BC LHC welcome trade unionists, students, academics and others interested in labour history and worker’s heritage to this conference.

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Location:
The Nest – 6133 University Blvd Vancouver, BC Canada (University of British Columbia campus)

Program:
2017 Conference Program (PDF color)
2017 Conference Program (PDF b/w)

Registration Details:
Register online with PayPal or
download instructions for registration by mail with check.

Hotel Accommodations:
Registrants are responsible for booking your own accommodation. A limited block of rooms has been secured at the Ponderosa Suites – 2017 W. Mall. This is a new student residence 5 minutes walk from the conference site. (Shuttle for those requiring).

There are 2 options, both offer daily housekeeping:

A) Ponderosa Studio Suite: double bed, full kitchen, private bath @ $120.00 per room/night + 13% taxes; or

B) Ponderosa Premium Single: a single bed within a 4-bedroom unit with 2 full bathrooms, kitchen, dining and sitting area @ $56.00 per person/night + 13% taxes

Make reservations by APRIL 25th directly with UBC Accommodations. Indicate you are with the “PNLHA Labour History Conference” for the reduced rate.

Tel (604) 822-1000 | Toll Free 1-888-822-1030 | Fax (604) 822-1001
Email: reservations@housing.ubc.ca

Subject to availability, these rates are extended 3 days before and 3 days after the conference for those wishing an extended stay in Vancouver. Cancellation charges will apply.

Note: Parking is an additional $16/day or $35/wk.  Transit express bus to downtown 20 minutes.

Questions? Email pnlha@shaw.ca or call Joey Hartman at 778-870-0703

2017 PNLHA Conference – Call for Papers

Echoes of the 1917 Russian Revolution; Decades of Radicalism and Red Scares in the Labour Movements of the Pacific NorthwestCFP

May 26 – 28, 2017
Labour History Conference
Vancouver, British Columbia

Sponsors: Pacific Northwest Labour History Association & BC Labour Heritage Centre

The Russian Revolution was one of the most significant events of its decade. As described in Oregonian John Reed’s book, there were events leading to and flowing from those “Ten Days That Shook the World” in October 1917.

In Canada and the US, many 20170453269_95b7cbaa22_oworkers saw an opportunity for class war, believing that socialism could overcome capitalism as the dominant political reality. In the Pacific Northwest, new forms of industrial organizing were bolstered by aspirations of a new world order, and the labour movement briefly swelled with enthusiastic members who were eager to be part of the change.

Communists and socialists developed as key leaders in the labour movement, and in organizing the unemployed and disenfranchised. General strikes in Vancouver, Seattle, and Winnipeg, the OBU, On-to-Ottawa Trek, and jobless sit-down strikes, and new unions of woodworkers, miners, shipyard workers, and fishers were all communist and socialist-led.

21835627452_062d9964f9_oBut capitalism held firm and enjoyed the resources and political clout of the wealthy. Activists were tagged as Bolsheviks and foreign-born agitators risked deportation for their activism.

The cold-war politics lasted decades, with “red-led” unions subject to purges and disbandment. Many individuals suffered personal consequences, including losing their livelihood.

This conference will explore the impacts and lasting influences of this history on contemporary labour.

Continue reading

New labor history awards

LBL_fcov_72rgb_522_630_90Canadian wins ILHA book award

Canadian labor historian Craig Heron has won the International Labor History Association (ILHA) Book of the Year Award for 2015 for Lunch-Bucket Lives, Remaking the Workers’ City (Toronto: Between the Lines, 2015). The ILHA describes the book as “a remarkably thorough study of workers and their city of Hamilton, Ontario, over a fifty-year period, 1890-1940.” The ILHA statement adds that Lunch-Bucket Lives reveals “the inner dynamics of labor situated in an environment of deep anti-labor hostility, political struggles, community cross-pressures, societal and economic upheavals that, taken together, drove changes in the labor sphere. The limits of labor power are explored and close attention to the political actors given, including conservative, liberal, socialist, communist, and independent progressive tendencies, yet without a worn, cold-war ideological framework.”

NYLHA history awards announced

The New York Labor History Association has announced its award competition for 2016. The awards “recognize series study in labor and work history.” Available are the Barbara Wertheimer Prize for the best undergraduate research paper and the Bernard Bellush Prize for best graduate student research paper. Both awards offer a $250 award. Entrants should send (email acceptable) one copy of their paper to Brian Greenberg, Department of History and Anthropology, Monmouth University, West Long Branch, NJ 07764, bgreenbe@monmouth.edu . The deadline is June 15, 2016. For more, visit NYLHA Wertheimer and Bellush Prizes .

Success in correcting Oregon labor history

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 2.07.31 PMOregon trustee Norm Diamond has succeeded in correcting the labor history surrounding a new Portland bar named after the notorious Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumbermen (4Ls).

“After extensive exchanges with the bar owner,”, Diamond provided the real story behind the 4Ls for posting to their web site. The site now includes some of his suggested wording: http://loyallegionpdx.com/about/where-did-the-name-loyal-legion-come-from/

The welcome changes came after Diamond published his comments in the March 16 Northwest Labor Press.

“The 4Ls was far from a union in any meaningful sense,” wrote Diamond. “It was a World War I-era organization specifically created by the U.S. War Department to undermine labor organizing in the woods (IWW) and mills (AFL).” In fact, the 4Ls, founded in 1917, broke a logger and lumber workers’ strike jointly orchestrated by both labor organizations.

“It’s important to hold onto our heritage and not let it be distorted,” Diamond concluded. “That history is all around us.” As an example, he notes that the building where the bar is located “hosted Ku Klux Klan rallies when the KKK was a Portland political power in the 1920s.”

See the full story here: https://nwlaborpress.org/2016/03/return-of-the-loyal-legion/

2016 PNLHA Labor History Calendar

The 2016 Labor History Calendar is now available. The PNLHA Labor History wall calendar in its 36th edition is the only regional labor calendar in the United States and we are extremely proud of that!

Last year over 8,000 calendars were distributed and with your help we can accomplish this again.

2016 PNLHA CalendarMany of our local unions buy the calendars and give as a “thank you’” to shop stewards, e-board members & the membership at-large. Some buy and resell to help fund educational or labor history committees. These calendars also make great gifts for family, friends and co-workers! There are many ways to spread the word about LABOR HISTORY.

The 2016 calendar includes over 40 historical pictures as well as local union charter dates and major labor events.

A large number of the union’s custom imprint their calendars advertising local union information, meeting dates, website/phone number

As always, each 2015 PNLHA dues paying member is mailed a complimentary calendar.

Download the rate sheet here.

Place an order for your calendar by emailing pnlha1@aol.com

International labor history conference coming

Image from NALHC Facebook page.

Image from NALHC Facebook page.

The North American Labor History Conference (NALHC) will hold its 37th annual international conference in Detroit on October 22-24, 2015 under the theme Labor, Law, and Progressive Activism.

NALHC, an international conference with global perspectives on labor history, welcomes proposals from a wide variety of disciplines and from scholars and activists working in various geographical and temporal frameworks.

The Call for Papers notes that “From ancient to modern times, from peasant to post-industrial societies, from the local to the global, humans have labored and lived under the codes of law.

“By the early 20th century, we saw the transformation whereby labor became part of law; protected and reinforced by it. How workers experience their everyday lives and enact their sense of agency is often circumscribed or enabled by the actions, legal and extra-legal, of states. But legal representation did not come without the need for progressive social activism.

“On the 80th anniversary of the Wagner Act, we encourage submissions that consider not only the legal boundaries of labor, whether free or unfree, but also the lived experiences of workers in local, national, and/or international contexts.”

Submissions of proposals for papers, panels, and roundtables should include a one paragraph abstract and a brief biographical statement from each participant. Submissions should be sent before April 30, 2015 to:

Thomas Klug, Lead Coordinator, North American Labor History Conference, Department of History, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, 313-577-2525, Fax: 313-577-6987, nalhc@wayne.edu .